The fruit-theory of human evolution
  • RudyRudy
    Posts: 3
    When I first started studying human evolution (in the early 1970s), the first thing that caught my attention was the ridiculously fast growth of the evolving brain of our ancestors during the Paleolithic period. This has intrigued me ever since, because all of the explanations offered by mainstream paleontologists left me feeling strangely dissatisfied. When I finally read Left in the Dark, several years ago, it knocked my socks off, because it answered my unanswered questions and explained the anomalies, regarding human evolution. Since then, I've been waiting for serious researchers to comment of the fruit-theory of human evolution, as described in Tony's book, and hopefully to develop the idea. I would also be interested in any thoughts that anyone else might have on this subject.
  • DACDAC
    Posts: 28
    Ahh nice to meet you Rudy, my partner and I have written a large paper on the subject., I will share much more in the future... Very busy at this very moment, hehehhe Looking forward to an enjoyable, stimulating, exchange...
  • DACDAC
    Posts: 28
    A short summation, unedited or fully annotated, providing a refutation of much of the populist, culturally conditioned, research on human evolution.

    1) The expensive tissue hypothesis has been demonstrated to be false in numerous recent studies ( for example, Navarrete A. et al. 2011); and the human gut size fits perfectly in the middle of a broad comparison of frugivorous primates (Pasquet P, Hladik C.M (2005)

    2) The Savannah theory of bipedalism is all but in the dustbin; due to many incontrovertible inconsistencies.

    3) In all scientific history but a single chimpanzee fossil has been uncovered; we know remarkably little about their evolution (we therefore also do not understand their specific evolutionary trajectory)

    4) Bones completely dissolve in the rainforest; and finding a single fossil ANYWHERE is like winning in the lottery.

    5) Human hands, agility and mobility are excellent resources to source quality fruit year round in the nonseasonal tropics. Running and walking are interrelated.

    6) Humans "competed" with predators the size of small vehicles during much of hominin evolution; some western researchers may be highly culturally conditioned in their appraisal of our ancestors hunting capabilities, see Hart D and Sussman R (2011).

    7) The study of wild fruit in Africa, India and Malaysia remains in its infancy, see (lost crops of Africa (2008), national academies press)

    8) Orangutans sometimes enjoy more than 8000 calories in single day (knott. C 2008)

    9) Humans have recently been shown to possess excellent tree climbing abilities (Vivek V. Venkataraman, et al. 2012). This human capacity was discarded until recently.

    10) Despite the hopes and dreams of some ambitious researchers, feeding the notions of populists; eager to justify their consumption of animal flesh, whilst boosting their manliness; imagining their overweight bodies as the perfect examples of true hunters, the study of human evolution is in its infancy! A famous anthropologist recently asked a revealing question, which exemplifies the state of our "knowledge" on the subject: "does one new discovery mean all new textbooks" (Dunsworth, H. 2010)

    11) The first evidence of ANY, not, necessarily, consistent, employment of bow and arrow is dated to 64.000 years ago. Studies of present day human hunting capacities are anachronistic due to major technological advancements, such as the bow and arrow, and the extinction of MAJOR, gigantic, unimaginably deadly, predators, previously cohabiting the African environment. (see, Hart D and Sussman R (2011).

    12) Due to tradition and culture, we may do things in a certain way, for a very long time, originally due to necessity or chance, whereafter, irrespective of whether better ways to do that something have existed or might exist, we may persist, because of our inherent love and "knowledge" of the familiar; it is difficult to foster change. Wherefore, it can be highly misleading to extrapolate from, present day or otherwise, circumstances what was or is necessary.

    13) It may easily be cultural conditioning and wishful thinking influencing some researchers; immediately presuming the ability to walk/run very long distances must have evolved do to hunting; it may perfectly serve the purpose of covering large areas in search of quality fruit; a limiting factor for chimpanzees/bonobos during certain seasons. Less mobile primates must proportionally (brain size) spent more time eating and digesting food (i.e greens, see, the mostly sedentary Gorillas!)
  • dfhdfh
    Posts: 35
    i didn't know orangutangs could eat 8000 kcals+ in a day, impressive :) this paper of yours, is it available online? i would love to read it.
  • _ts__ts_
    Posts: 50
    Hey Rudy! I too was very dissatisfied by the conventional explanation for the rapid explosion of brain size, and its recent shrinking (which even the mainstream recognizes, although few know about it http://discovermagazine.com/2010/sep/25-modern-humans-smart-why-brain-shrinking )

    The explanations going around the scientific community for the drop in brain size are equally puzzling, and I think very telling in regards to our current state of mind and our capacity to basically confabulate (lie to ourselves)
  • _ts__ts_
    Posts: 50
    btw, great points DAC

    We seem to have forgotten that nothing fossilizes in the forest, and that fruit eating wouldn't be found in fossils anyways. I think a very compelling case has been made by Tony and many others that our physiology suggests a diet high in fruit.

    Often times people cite fossils and and the scant evidence of meat and fire usage as evidence supporting the conventional view of our origins. I believe there's a question very similar to this in the FAQ here http://beyond-belief.org.uk/node/9

    A useful analogy that really helped me understand this culturally conditioned cave-man view has been made using orangutans. Orangutans occupy a wide variety of habitats and diets; mainly the jungles, but others have branched off into more arid places and adopted different diets as a result in order to survive.

    So suppose we had never discovered orangutans. If, say, a few thousand years from now, long after they have gone extinct, humans were too look back and have the luck to find fossil evidence of their existence outside of the forest, eating a certain kind of diet, what conclusions and inferences could we logically make from this information? It is only a snapshot of one particular habitat/diet and says nothing about what was still going on in other habitats- such as the forest where things don't fossilize. For us to conclude that THIS snapshot depicted THE diet and habitat of all orangutans everywhere would be completely ridiculous and getting ahead of ourselves...yet this is exactly what humans have concluded when looking at the fossils of our own species.

    Once you look at the physiology of us and the biochemistry involved in rapid exponential brain expansion that view becomes even more dubious.
  • SLQSLQ
    Posts: 19
    You guys have a much more 'informed' view of the resources advancing one after another theory - but the reality appears to be that few of them are nothing more than speculative positions, poorly supported.

    During the many years I was working on silver hydrosol, which you probably know of as 'colloidal silver', it occurred to me that the evolutional leap from single cell life to higher, and more complex, forms of life could only have occurred in a silver-rich environment ....because it [sic] is both lethal to the lower forms of life that would have attacked and destroyed those efforts AND progenerative inasmuch as silver is also a catalyst for the development of stem cells. [See Dr Robert O. Becker's work and papers during the '60s & '70s that the academic establishment dismissed so shamefully].

    The Truth resonates with deep satisfaction - our spirits are hungry for it. The Natural World - for all its descent into a tainted illusion is still so beautiful, it makes your heart respond in awe to it.... so with the beauty of man, the creature who had the god-like talents to speak, sing and dance....! Our impact on the wider world of creatures that surrounds us here ....must have been deeply affected [negatively as well] by our turn [and inclination] to really aggressive behavior ....to a species that then had to kill for a living!

    Rudy, DAC, Ts ....your musings are enjoyable.

  • DACDAC
    Posts: 28
    Great example, TS. And the Orangutans will probably devolve or disappear due to the dire circumstances forced upon their existence.

    Ts, we will, in due course, prepare a second fairly extended edition of the draft concerning human evolution that you have read, in which we have uncovered numerous fallacies rarely discussed, concentrated most of the evidence in support of a frugivorous theory of human evolution and found new evidence to present. Particularly, the matter of obtaining sufficient energy from fruit, appears to be a major issue, for many researchers, although so very little is actually known about this subject, we hope to further address this issue, in depth.

    If anyone has interesting or novel knowledge or insight to share, please do. Eventually we will release this paper, and hopefully break through the paper based foundation, which many mainstream researchers think they firmly stand upon.

  • _ts__ts_
    Posts: 50
    Yeah the energy thing has always confused me somewhat

    If i remember correctly, i read a recent news article saying that obtaining the necessary calories on a raw plant diet would require 9 hours of non-stop eating! As enjoyable as 9 hours of gobbling delicious food would be, I ate around 3000 calories yesterday and, obviously, spent no where near 9 hours eating
  • RudyRudy
    Posts: 3
    Hey DAC,
    All those points are Those points are well taken. I especially like #9:
    "Humans have recently been shown to possess excellent tree climbing abilities (Vivek V. Venkataraman, et al. 2012). This human capacity was discarded until recently."

    As a child, I was an avid tree climber, and, as far as I can tell, all children are, if allowed to do so.

    Thanks, ts, for the link to the article in Discover Magazine. I will check it out.

    RE fruit not having "enough energy," I have been on a raw diet for years, getting about 90% of my calories from fruit, sometimes more. I have maintained my weight and muscle mass very nicely, and my recent blood test showed that my blood proteins, blood sugar and triglycerides were excellent.


  • SLQSLQ
    Posts: 19
    We, Ruth and I, spent a number of years on a raw-vegan diet - the levels of energy and recovery of great health we gained was the stunning consequence of this finally appropriate behavior. Only the difficulty of maintaining it while traveling and where access to our 'normal' or 'usual' brands - like nuts and certain grains - was limited - did we revert to adding a lot more cooked food to the diet. But a relapse from a vegetarian/vegan diet has become anathema - don't think that the taking of other animal or fish life to feed upon is even a remote possibility. After all, it is like partaking of one's own family ....to eat these beautiful creatures. All animate life, it is now clear, is Sacred. To respect and protect it ....is why we have inherited this much from Mother Earth.
  • DACDAC
    Posts: 28
    I very much enjoy how you "feel" the world SLQ! When I read your posts; I feel that we feel from the same sacred, aesthetic, space.

    And yes Rudy, I very much agree, it is unfortunate that some do not reach far enough into this journey; due to detoxification and regeneration issues, my partner and I, are specializing in the application of herbal (and fasting) modalities buffering and facilitating this process.

    Rudy :-) please by all means share any knowledge that you find often overlooked.

    We have to remember, however, that researchers are referring to wild fruits*, though not exclusively, Wrangham et al., even propose modern unprocessed diets are unsustainable, due to a lack of energy, which is evidently false, in the paper, I mentioned previously, we delve into great detail as to how preposterous this claim truly is; exposing the uselessness of the proposed evidence thereof.

    *The quality and water soluble carbohydrate content varies greatly among wild fruits, and the field has thus far only been minimally explored.

    All the best dear friends!



  • SLQSLQ
    Posts: 19
    There is an awesome gentility in this forum. It is an honor to be part of it. I hope it will prosper - the goodwill it needs for that is certainly not in short supply. yes, 'all the best'.....!
  • RudyRudy
    Posts: 3
    Yes, SLQ, I'm inclined to agree.
    Maybe eating all that fruit has something to do with it. :)
  • SLQSLQ
    Posts: 19
    I think you may be on to something, Rudy....

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